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The Time of Year for Chai Tea

Cochin Masala Chai

The cooler weather is here, and people are starting to order chai tea.  We wrote about Chai Tea in a blog post a while back (here is a link) and thought it was time for an update.  I was reminded that January is National Hot Tea Month, so I am getting a jump on that important holiday!

Our Serving Partners offering our Cochin Masla Chai include the following; Cafe in the Park, Oasis Cafe, Burns Court Bistro, The Breakfast House, The Bean Coffeehouse, Pastry Arts, The Selby House Cafe at Selby Gardens, and Morton’s Gourmet Market.  Thank you for supporting local businesses.

Thanksgiving is next week, and a cuppa Chai before or after your meal might keep everyone awake for the Football games or the Dog Show!  This is the time of year for Chai Tea.

Time for Chai Tea

Chai is the generic word for tea in much of the World. The British adopted the word as slang, and ‘cha’ or ‘char’ became the meaning of a teacup.   So what is true Masala Chai?

This beverage from the Indian subcontinent is made by brewing tea with a mixture of aromatic spices and herbs.  The traditional process of making chai involves actively boiling the tea leaves over sustained heat with spices.  While there are many preparation variations today (some not too good either!), there are four components that remain true to chai tea’s original idea.

  1. Strong black tea – usually Assam, but can be Ceylon. The loose leaf tea is strong, so spices and sweeteners do not overpower the flavor.
  2. Sweetener, usually white sugar, palm, or coconut sugars. A large quantity is required to bring out the flavor of the spices. You can use honey or agave also. Condensed milk can be used, which also adds sweetness.
  3. Milk, usually whole milk for richness, but alternatives like Soy, Almond, and Oat can be used. 1/4 to 1/2 parts are required.
  4. Spice, usually warm spices such as cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, star anise, peppercorn, and cloves, with cardamom being the predominant flavor. Other possible additions are nutmeg, rose, licorice root, almond, and saffron.

Cochin Masala Chai

At Local Tea Company, we offer an outstanding Cochin Masala Chai, authentic and warm traditional flavor. It bears the name of a busy port, which also has a long history in trading spices.

We like to drink it without anything added, though I admit to having caught the Oat Milk craze.  Other options include Almond Milk, Soy, and good old-fashioned milk.

Go ahead and try a few different options and see which one you like the best.  Then put your feet up, stay warm with a cup of Cochin Masala Chai, and celebrate the holidays!

 

More Bertha Palmer

More Bertha Palmer

Bertha Honore Palmer.  I hope you may already have taken advantage of the discount being offered this month on Bertha Palmer Centennial Tea at our redesigned web site, Local Tea Co.  If not, perhaps I can convince you otherwise by sharing a few details of Bertha’s tea ingredients.

Bertha Palmer Centennial Tea

I love the taste of the herbs, perfectly blended with Rooibos tea.  But until I really researched them all that, I realized what an amazing combination and marriage they are.

Fennel

(Foeniculum vulgare) is a member of the carrot family.  The plant is tall and statuesque (Bertha!) with large glossy stems and light, feathery leaves. It blooms small yellow flowers that yield greenish-brown seeds with a licorice flavor.  Fennel is renowned for digestive disorders since it stimulates the secretion of digestive enzymes, calms the digestive tract, prevents spasms, and improves absorption of nutrients. That is just for starters! Some other benefits are fluid retention, gum disorders, diuretic properties, which help fight urinary tract infections, and strength. It contains calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, iron, selenium, and Vitamins A, C, and E.

Licorice

(Glycyrrhiza glabra) A woody perennial which has a bright green stem and dark green oval leaves.  The flowers are shaped like peas.  The big taproot with long branch roots can spread to 3 feet.  Licorice is a tonic boost for the adrenal glands.  It produces our ‘fight or flight’ hormones to help cope with stress. Glycyrrhizin has anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory value so eases and soothes the respiratory tract and arthritic pain.  Licorice also helps in the stomach department, soothing indigestion, and reducing acid secretions.  It contains Iron, magnesium, potassium, selenium, lecithin, calcium, and vitamins A, B, C, and E.

Lemon Verbena

Lippia citriodora) is an aromatic shrub with pale green leaves and pale purple flowers. It eases spasms, settles the stomach, fights indigestion and flatulence, reduces fevers, and is a stimulant for the skin. Lemon Verbena is excellent for flavor and synergy.

Cinnamon

(Cinnamon cassia) is a warm spice with a sweet, calming nature good for colds and chills, but antiseptic abilities will also help fight bacteria, viruses, fungal, and yeast infections. This is a powerful ingredient to have in any blend.

Peppermint

(Mentha piperita) There are more than 210 species of this aromatic plant, which will invigorate with one cut leaf. Menthol has an anesthetic effect on the stomach’s nerve endings, so it is helpful with nausea, seasickness, and pains in the abdomen.  Peppermint will calm you all over!

All these beautiful herbs are blended with Rooibos tea (Asplathis linearis), which is also an anti-spasmodic (and used in South Africa to soothe colic in children) along with essential daily minerals and vitamins too.

At Local Tea Company, we believe Rooibos is a cure to all ailments and feel that this formidable woman, Bertha Honore Palmer, would have been a huge fan of this perfectly blended, soothing tea.

Take a break and try some Bertha Palmer Centennial Tea and check out our Facebook page for more updated details of our Local Tea Journey activities.

Cheers,
the TeaLady

Cochin Masala Chai

Cochin Masala Chai

January is National Hot Tea Month, and all over the country, we are experiencing some chilly weather, even here in Florida.  As everyone is much more appreciative of the benefits of drinking a nice hot cuppa, I can think of no better way to celebrate hot tea month than drinking the hottest of teas, Masala Chai.

Chai

Chai is the generic word for tea in much of the World. The British adopted the word as slang, and ‘cha’ or ‘char’ became the meaning of a teacup.   So what is true Masala Chai?

This beverage from the Indian subcontinent is made by brewing tea with a mixture of aromatic spices and herbs.  The traditional process of making chai involves actively boiling the tea leaves over sustained heat with spices.  While there are many variations of preparation today (some not too good either!), there are four components that remain true to chai tea’s original idea.

Chai starts with black loose leaf tea.
  1. Strong black tea, usually Assam, but can be Ceylon. The loose leaf tea is strong, so spices and sweeteners do not overpower the flavor.
  2. Sweetener, usually white sugar, palm, or coconut sugars. A large quantity is required to bring out the flavor of the spices. You can use honey or agave also. Condensed milk can be used, which also adds sweetness.
  3. Milk, usually whole milk for richness, but alternatives like Soy can be used. 1/4 to 1/2 parts are required.
  4. Spice, usually warm spices such as cardamom, cinnamon, ginger, star anise, peppercorn, and cloves, with cardamom being the predominant flavor. Other possible additions are nutmeg, rose, licorices root, almond, and saffron.

Cochin Masala Chai

At Local Tea Company, we offer an outstanding Cochin Masala Chai, authentic and gives a warm traditional flavor. It bears the name of a busy port, which also has a long history in trading spices. We like to drink it without anything added and have been sampling our chai in the Tea Room at Selby Gardens, and probably one of these Saturdays at the Sarasota Farmer’s Market.  Go ahead and try the different options and see which one you like the best.  Then put your feet up, stay warm with a cup of Cochin Masala Chai and celebrate Hot Tea month!

Cheers,
the TeaLady